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May 26, 2017

"The distributors that we've named in this complaint, distribute close to 90 percent of the opioids in this country," says Richard Fields, one of the attorneys working with the Cherokee Nation. "The pharmacy chains have over 80 percent of the market share." The lawsuit, which was filed in April, is in some ways a last ditch effort to force the hands of companies who many see as responsible for the growing opioid epidemic.

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April 24, 2017

There's a very large volume of opioids being distributed in the Cherokee territory -- sufficiently large to be shocking," said Richard Fields, special counsel to the attorney general of the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee Nation is suing for "hundreds of millions of dollars" in damages, said Fields, though the lawsuit does not specify a figure. Some of these damages seek compensation for addiction treatment, medical treatment for babies born with opioid dependence, welfare for children whose parents can't support them and law enforcement efforts to curb the opioid crisis in Cherokee communities.

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Press Releases

January 19, 2018

Suit Seeks To Hold Manufacturers, Distributors and Retailers Responsible for Cost, Impact of Prescription Opioid Epidemic

December 17, 2017

Decimated by addiction, its heritage at risk, the Cherokee Nation is trying to sue pharmacies and distributors. But it may be blocked from doing so.

Latest News

November 2, 2017

DOVER — The Delaware Department of Justice (DOJ) has retained a national group of attorneys and experts to investigate and, if appropriate, file suit against opioid manufacturers, opioid distributors and other entities that may have contributed to the opioid epidemic impacting Delaware. The lead law firm retained, Fields PLLC, has already filed national litigation against the opioid industry on behalf of the Cherokee Nation.

Press Releases

July 21, 2017

TAHLEQUAH, Oklahoma — As part of its campaign to end the opioid crisis and hold opioid distributors and pharmacy chains accountable, the Cherokee Nation today released disturbing new data from the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs demonstrating the dramatic oversupply of prescription opioid drugs by these companies. In 2015 and 2016, distributors shipped and pharmacies dispensed 184 million opioid pain pills in the 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma that comprise the Cherokee Nation – or 153 doses for every man, woman, and child in the area.

Latest News

July 12, 2017

A recent $35 million settlement shows a new government strategy of alleging drug diversion against drug manufacturers that fail to detect and report excessive opioid orders.

Latest News

July 4, 2017

The companies that manufacture and distribute highly addictive painkillers are facing a barrage of lawsuits for the toll their product has taken on communities across the country as the worst drug epidemic in U.S. history continues to escalate. Within the past year, at least 25 states, cities and counties have filed civil cases against manufacturers, distributors and large drugstore chains that make up the $13 billion-a-year opioid industry. In the past few weeks alone, the attorneys general for Ohio and Missouri, along with the district attorneys for three counties in Tennessee, filed suits against the industry — and the attorney general for Oklahoma filed suiton Friday.

Latest News

June 2, 2017

Richard Fields, a Washington, D.C., attorney representing the Cherokee Nation, which includes 200,000 people in 14 Oklahoma counties, said distributors must bear part of the blame because they knew “an obscene amount of drugs” was being distributed to states and small towns.”

Featured

May 26, 2017

"The distributors that we've named in this complaint, distribute close to 90 percent of the opioids in this country," says Richard Fields, one of the attorneys working with the Cherokee Nation. "The pharmacy chains have over 80 percent of the market share." The lawsuit, which was filed in April, is in some ways a last ditch effort to force the hands of companies who many see as responsible for the growing opioid epidemic.

Featured

April 24, 2017

There's a very large volume of opioids being distributed in the Cherokee territory -- sufficiently large to be shocking," said Richard Fields, special counsel to the attorney general of the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee Nation is suing for "hundreds of millions of dollars" in damages, said Fields, though the lawsuit does not specify a figure. Some of these damages seek compensation for addiction treatment, medical treatment for babies born with opioid dependence, welfare for children whose parents can't support them and law enforcement efforts to curb the opioid crisis in Cherokee communities.

Latest News

April 22, 2017

“Pharmacists have a duty only to fill scripts that are for a legitimate medical purpose,” said Richard Fields, a D.C.-based lawyer who filed the lawsuit on behalf of the tribe. “If a doctor is engaged in prescribing opioids illegally, that doesn’t relieve the pharmacy of liability.”

Latest News

April 20, 2017

Lawyers for the Cherokee Nation opened a new line of attack against the pharmaceutical industry Thursday, filing a lawsuit in tribal court that accuses the nation’s six top drug distributors and pharmacies of flooding communities in Oklahoma with hundreds of millions of highly addictive pain pills. The suit alleges that the companies violated sovereign Cherokee laws by failing to prevent the diversion of pain pills to the black market, profiting from the growing opioid epidemic and decimating communities across the nation’s 14 counties in the state.

Latest News

April 20, 2017

Cherokee Nation is suing CVS Health, Walgreens, and other drug companies and retailers, alleging the companies didn’t do enough to stop prescription painkillers from flooding the tribal community and creating a crisis of opioid addiction.

Latest News

April 20, 2017

The ex-CEO of litigation funder Juridica Asset Management Ltd. and a team from Boies Schiller Flexner have teamed up with the Cherokee Nation to sue major pharmaceutical distributors and retail pharmacies over the opioid addiction epidemic that has ravaged the tribe and much of the rest of the country. The suit, filed Thursday in the District Court of the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, alleges that drug distributing giants like McKesson Corp. and retail pharmacies such as CVS Health and Walgreen Co. violated tribal and federal laws by turning a blind eye as prescription pain killers flooded the streets.

Press Releases

April 20, 2017

Today, the Cherokee Nation filed a lawsuit against McKesson Corporation, Cardinal Health, Inc., AmerisourceBergen, CVS Health, Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc., and Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., charging the companies with failing to prevent the flow of illegally prescribed opioids to men, women and children in the Cherokee Nation. This lawsuit is the first of its kind filed in the United States, as it seeks to hold distributors and retailers responsible for perpetuating the opioid crisis in the 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma that comprise the Cherokee Nation. Experts expect other jurisdictions to file similar claims as communities grapple with the financial and social burdens of the opioid epidemic.

Richard Fields

April 13, 2017

Richard Fields was not the first person in the United States to get involved in litigation financing, nor was the company he helped found, Juridica Investments, the first litigation financing company. What he did accomplish with the launch of Juridica, was to prove there was a market for commercial litigation funding… His background in litigation finance, and his depth of experience in calculating risk give him an advantage which few practicing litigators can claim.

Latest News

April 5, 2017

A landmark anti-terrorism financing case which was presumed dead has now been surprisingly resuscitated by the US Supreme Court and could lead to a flood of new anti-terrorism financing lawsuits by foreigners (including Israelis) against foreign financial entities (including those banking for Palestinian terrorist groups) that do business in the US. This could change the face of international banking and impact the realm of US diplomacy in a variety of unpredictable ways.

Richard Fields

March 20, 2017

Although Augusta Capital and some patent-focused funders predated it in the United States, you might say that the launch of Juridica marked an inflection point for the U.S. litigation finance industry, showing others that there was a market for something called “commercial litigation funding.” Richard Fields had thought a lot about the valuation of cases as an asset prior to co-founding the company with Timothy Scrantom, and briefly ran a company that traded in insurance claims. Now, Fields has returned to being a litigator, and hopes to use his experience calculating risk to become a plaintiff’s attorney to be feared.

Latest News

August 14, 2015

Three days before a first-of-its-kind damages trial was supposed to start, a Middle Eastern bank has reached a settlement with hundreds of American plaintiffs, including victims of terrorist attacks around Israel, who had filed a lawsuit against the bank accusing it of supporting terrorism. A spokesman for the bank, Arab Bank, and a spokeswoman for one of the law firms representing the plaintiffs confirmed on Friday that an agreement had been reached but declined to offer additional details, including the amount of the settlement.

Richard Fields

October 21, 2012

Richard Fields made a fortune off the great tort waves of the 1980s and 1990s -- asbestos, silicone breast implants -- by extracting billions of dollars from insurance companies that were reluctant to pay the bills of his corporate clients. Now he's on the sidelines, investing in lawsuits instead of arguing them. Fields runs Juridica Investments Ltd. The London-listed firm has about $157 million invested in 23 cases, and claims an internal rate of return on completed investments of 85%.

Richard Fields

June 2, 2009

Richard W. Fields says he has come up with a win-win financial strategy for the downturn. He is investing in lawsuits. Not in trip-and-fall cases, mind you, but in disputes that are far larger, more costly and potentially more lucrative, often pitting major corporations against each other. Mr. Fields is chief executive of Juridica Capital Management, which runs a fund that invests in one side of a lawsuit in exchange for a share of any winnings.

Richard Fields

May 4, 2009

While hedge funds around the globe are watching their investments go up in smoke, one fund - Juridica Investments - has been enjoying nice returns. How? It puts its money in lawsuits. Launched in December 2007 by two lawyers, Richard Fields and Timothy Scrantom, Juridica gives money to Fortune 500-size companies or their lawyers in the early stages of corporate lawsuits in exchange for a share of the payout if the plaintiffs win or settle. (Think of it as a different form of investing in distress.)